Denomination
Standard weight
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AE tetradrachm
struck at Alexandria ONLY

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8.5 g



AV multiple
A 5 aureus piece (Quinio).

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5 aurei

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Heavy aureus (Binio)

Although the radiate crown implies double denomination, the weight is typically just ~2 grams more than standard aurei.

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8.20 g
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Aureus

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6.25 g
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AV quinarius

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irregular
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Antoninianus

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3.86 g
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Denarius

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Quinarius

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Dupondius
Does not exist. See note here.
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"As"

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"Semis"

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There are no dupondii - and no sestertii - which have been struck under Probus. Of copper denominations there are only "semis" or "as" (laurate crown, average weight between 5.5 and 6.5 g) but not really as such. These coins must be considered instead as little medallions intended for civil or military dignitaries at some festive occasions, such as Probus' triumph in Rome in 281. All these donativa coins (semis=as=little medallion, denarii, AE quinarii, big medaillons with several weights and dimensions, aurei and AV quinarii) have been struck at the same time for the same occasions but for personages of varying rank.

The reason why there were no real asses, dupondii or sestertii, is that the metal value (5.5 - 6.5 g of copper) of these little denominations (fractions of denarii) was higher than that of antoniniani (3.1 g of copper). Thus they must be considered as donativa and not normal money.

Philippe Gysen; epistolar communication.